Mulder and Scully investigate in Squeeze.png

Grace Duffy, For The Mary Sue

“Scully prepares a profile arguing that the killer has a form of OCD. She suggests that he may revisit the crime scenes to relive the high. Investigators thank her in the most dismissive way possible, but Colton says she can come on their stakeout of the crime scenes because he’s nicely condescending like that.”

“Outside, Scully questions Mulder, saying he was being ‘territorial’ around the other agents earlier. He replies that he was, because although she doesn’t always agree with his take on things she ‘respects the journey.’ I like to see how much mutual understanding there is between these two, even if they’ve only been working together for a few weeks. Mulder is far more respectful of her PoV than her erstwhile classmate. He also hadn’t supported Scully’s profile earlier, but was big enough to admit that he was wrong about it when they found Eugene.”

Autumn Tysko’s Reviews

“In watching this episode I realized, once again, how much I miss writers Morgan and Wong on the X-Files. They had a gift for telling a story on so many levels and giving the characters layers that lazy writing often forgets.”

“One of my favorite Scully moments of all time is in this episode when she first subtly threatens Colton for impeding their investigation and then, in classic Scully fashion, answers the ‘Whose side are you on?’ question with, ‘The victim’s.’ That’s a moment from the beginning of the series that defined Scully’s integrity for me. Another grand moment was when they find a creepy hole in the wall and no bones are made about Scully calmly tucking her gun in and going down first. It was a case early on where the writers did something special by NOT treating the woman character special.”

“Dinner at the institution is a scary scary time. It looks like Tooms is being served ranch beans, cream corn, a biscuit, and a urine sample.”

April Walsh, For Medium

“When a former colleague, let’s call him Agent Douche, brings Scully in on the case, she starts to get the hint that she’s losing the respect of other agents by aligning herself with Mulder (they call her Mrs. Spooky now).”

Meghan Deans, For Tor

“…the episode where Dana Scully must publicly pick a side. Now sure, granted, sure, she’s already pointed a gun at the Air Force and carefully worded her field reports to mask all of Mulder’s crazy. But this time around she must admit her allegiances to an old Academy chum named Tom Colton (played with a sneer by Donal Logue).”

“As Mulder and Scully leave the Tooms estate, the mutant reaches out and snags Scully’s necklace, marking her as prey with a gesture that eerily mirrors Mulder’s earlier, less-murdery move.”

“While the show’s mytharc hints at complicated conspiracies and vast evils, Tooms is a local danger. He’s in your chimney, he’s stealing your jewelry, and he’s dripping bile in the nice bath you just drew for yourself. Rather than offering a respite from the mytharc, the best monsters of the week give you the sense that the world is just brimming with strange and supernatural things. Many of which would really like to murder you.”

Darren, For m0vieblog

“There is a reason that serial killers work so well as an expression about the fears of urban living. A lot of people, living on top of one another, anonymously in a noisy environment provides an ample hunting ground for a human predator. It’s notable that the victims in Squeeze are all killed in places where they should have been safe—inside their apartment or their office. They died locked away from the world, anonymously and without anybody noticing what was going on.”

“He is perfectly adapted to the city—arguably better than the humans who designed it and who inhabit it. If the serial killer is generally seen as an urban predator, then Tooms is an urban superpredator.”

“Mulder is dismissive, in that jerkish way that Mulder is always dismissive of everybody else’s crazy theories. ‘He’s not coming back here,’ he tells Scully. ‘His thrill is derived from the challenge of seemingly impossible entry. He’s already beaten this place. If you’d read the X-file on the case, you’d come to the same conclusion.’ That last remark is the ultimate sort of nerdish complaint, the ‘I’m more familiar with the source material so I know more’ argument.”

“At the same time, however, there’s a hint that Mulder does care about Scully. For all his arrogance and brash egotism dealing with her fellow agents, there’s a pang of insecurity as Mulder asks, ‘Do you think I’m Spooky?’ For her part, Scully has made her choice. She is working with her partner, and she doesn’t need anybody in the FBI to watch her back or to rescue her from that dank basement.”

WTF Did I Miss on Tumblr

“The next day, Scully’s having lunch with some dude she met on Tinder. He immediately starts making fun of her for chasing aliens with ~Spooky Mulder~ and she’s like, ‘Fuck you, judgmental ginger—I WISH I WOULD HAVE SWIPED LEFT.’”

“Scully rubs it in [to Colton] like ‘YOU DON’T OWN THE FUCKING CRIME SCENE, YOU FILTHY CASUAL.’”

“The next chance they will get to catch him would be in 2023, AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘and you’re gonna be head of the bureau by then, so we have to do this thing and that thing and etc.’ BUT EXCUSE ME HE JUST GAVE HER THE SWEETEST COMPLIMENT, HOW THE FUCK DOES THE FANDOM GLOSS OVER THIS I HAVE NEVER SEEN THIS MENTIONED PRETTY MUCH ANYWHERE EVER. HE BELIEVES IN HER SO MUCH AND ALREADY KNOWS SHE’S A STRONG-ASS WOMAN WHO’S GOING TO ACHIEVE ALL THE THINGS. I MEAN, LOOK…”

“LIVER NEST. They descend and find an altar full of murder trinkets…”

 

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